pluto 15  results

Backlit Pluto and Charon, illustrationBacklit Pluto and Charon, illustration
Illustration of the blue giant star HD 37974, in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Astronomers suspect that it is surrounded by a dusty disc, stretching for 60 times the distance of Pluto's orbit from the Sun (about 3,000 astronomical units, or AU). The disc could be a remnant from planet formation, or the beginning of the planet-creation process.Illustration of the blue giant star HD 37974, in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Astronomers suspect that it is surrounded by a dusty disc, stretching for 60 times the distance of Pluto's orbit from the Sun (about 3,000 astronomical units, or AU). The disc could be a remnant from planet formation, or the beginning of the planet-creation process.
An artist's impression of the dwarf planet Pluto as it might appear from the surface of its biggest natural satellite, CharonAn artist's impression of the dwarf planet Pluto as it might appear from the surface of its biggest natural satellite, Charon
New Horizons spacecraft at PlutoNew Horizons spacecraft at Pluto
New Horizons spacecraft at PlutoNew Horizons spacecraft at Pluto
New Horizons spacecraft at PlutoNew Horizons spacecraft at Pluto
New Horizons spacecraft at PlutoNew Horizons spacecraft at Pluto
Close up of a Pluto sphinx moth caterpillar, Xylophanes pluto, feeding on fire bush leavesClose up of a Pluto sphinx moth caterpillar, Xylophanes pluto, feeding on fire bush leaves
Close up of a Pluto sphinx moth caterpillar, Xylophanes pluto, feeding on fire bush leaves.Close up of a Pluto sphinx moth caterpillar, Xylophanes pluto, feeding on fire bush leaves.
Close up of a Pluto sphinx moth caterpillar, Xylophanes pluto, feeding on fire bush leaves.Close up of a Pluto sphinx moth caterpillar, Xylophanes pluto, feeding on fire bush leaves.
Close up of a Pluto sphinx moth caterpillar, Xylophanes pluto, feeding on fire bush leaves.Close up of a Pluto sphinx moth caterpillar, Xylophanes pluto, feeding on fire bush leaves.
Illustration of a view of Pluto seen from the surface of its largest moon Charon. Because Pluto and Charon are tidally locked, they keep the same face towards each other at all times, as the Moon does to the Earth. So if one stood on Charon (or Pluto) the other world would stay fixed in the sky - never setting or rising, but still cycling through its phases. And if one were on the wrong hemisphere of Pluto (or Charon) one would never see the other world.Illustration of a view of Pluto seen from the surface of its largest moon Charon. Because Pluto and Charon are tidally locked, they keep the same face towards each other at all times, as the Moon does to the Earth. So if one stood on Charon (or Pluto) the other world would stay fixed in the sky - never setting or rising, but still cycling through its phases. And if one were on the wrong hemisphere of Pluto (or Charon) one would never see the other world.
Quantised orbits of the planetsQuantised orbits of the planets
Quantised orbits of the planetsQuantised orbits of the planets
Naples, Italy - July 10, 2014: Rape of Proserpina statueNaples, Italy - July 10, 2014: Rape of Proserpina statue

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